HomeCrochet How To Read Mosaic Crochet Charts for Beginners

How To Read Mosaic Crochet Charts for Beginners

Comments : 4 Posted in : Crochet on by : Carrie Wente

Have you seen the beautiful mosaic crochet patterns out there? I have just fallen in love with the contrast of colors and texture the patterns create.  But the graphed out patterns can be kind of confusing if you aren’t familiar with this type of stitch.

What is Mosaic Crochet?

Well, I planned to give a little bit of trivia history here, but it seems that there really isn’t any. Mosaic crochet is a method of crocheting what gives your work a look that resembles tapestry.

Mosaic crochet is worked from the front, meaning you don’t turn your work as you do in traditional crochet. This makes for a lot of ends.  The one and the only thing I don’t like about crocheting is weaving in the ends. I mean, I have actually put projects away after crocheting them and gone on to others just because I don’t want to weave in the ends. Yes, it’s that bad!

Weaving in the ends is something I don’t have to do with the project I’m currently working on though. It’s great, I’m leaving a 6″ tail at each end and when I’m done I will tie four of them at a time together to make a fringe. Easy peasy and cool beans!

Over the past couple of weeks, I have made an afghan that used up some left-over yarn that I had intended for another project. But with the Covid-19 shut-down of 2020, I was unable to purchase more yarn to make this project the size I wanted. It’s too short to really be considered a blanket, so we will call it a lapghan. It’s done in single crochet, so it’s very sturdy and heavy. I really like the feel of the yarn I used. I just wish I could have gotten more.

So, I have come up with 4 different patterns that I incorporated into my lapghan. I have listed them below with charts and photos.

When you look at the charts below, you can sort of see the pattern as it will look when finished. The “trick” to it is when you double crochet, you are crocheting in the next stitch in the row below.

When making your double crochet, make an ldc, which is a double crochet in the front loop of the next stitch, 1 row below as shown in the photos.

1) To make ldc, start with yarn over…

 

2)…pull up a loop (three loops on hook)…

 

3) Yarn over and pull through two loops.

 

4) Two loops on hook, yarn over and…

 

5) …pull through the remaining two loops. One loop left on the hook.

Pattern #1

ldc = double crochet in row below blank square = single crochet

Stitches key in pattern:

ch = chain

ldc = double crochet in the next stitch in the row below

sc = single crochet

This pattern is fairly straight forward and repeats itself with each row by moving over one space at the beginning of each row until you reach row 11 and then you move back one ldc at the beginning of the row.

Row 1

With color A, single sc, finish off leaving a tail of 6″ at both the beginning of the row and at the end from here on out. Do not turn.

Row 2

Slip stitch in first chain and ldc same stitch, sc next 10 stitches, *ldc next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, repeat across, finish.

Row 3

Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, ldc next stitch, sc next 10 stitches, *ldc next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches,* across, across to end finish.

Row 4

Switch to Color B. Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, sc, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, across to end finish.

Row 5

Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, sc in next 2 stitches, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, across to end finish.

Row 6

Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, sc in next 3 stitches, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, across to end finish.

Row 7

Switch to color C. Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, sc in next 4 stitches, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, across to end finish.

Row 8

Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, sc in next 5 stitches, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, across to end, finish.

Row 9

Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, sc in next 6 stitches, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, across to end, finish.

Row 10

Slip stitch in first chain and sc in the same stitch, sc in next 7 stitches, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches*, across to den, finish.

Row 11

Use Color C. Slip stitch in the first chain, sc in the same stitch, sc in next 6 stitches, ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches, *ldc in next stitch, sc in next 10 stitches* across to end, finish.

Row 12-19

Repeat row 11 decreasing number of ldc at the beginning. Change to color B for rows 14-16 and color A for rows 17-19.


Pattern #2

This pattern has an Aztec feel to it. I may look difficult, but each square repeats on itself and the stitches fall into place quickly to form the pattern.

Stitches Used:

ch = chain

ldc = double crochet in the next stitch in the row below

sc = single crochet

** = repeat section within.

Row 1

With color A,  slip stitch,sc in first stitch, sc across, finish off leaving a 6″ tail at both the beginning and end of the row, here and throughout. Do not turn here and throughout.

Row 2

Repeat Row 1 with color B

Row 3

With color A slip stitch in first sc of the last row, sc in the same stitch, sc next 8, *ldc next stitch, sc next 9 stitches* repeat to end, finish.

Row 4

Color B, slip stitch in first stitch and ldc in same stitch sc in next 7, ldc, sc (10 stitches) *ldc, sc in next 7, ldc, sc* across to end.

Row 5

Switch to Color A, slip stitch in first stitch and sc in the same stitch, ldc next stitch, sc next 5 stitches, ldc, sc, ldc (10 stitches), * sc, ldc, sc next 5, ldc, sc, ldc* across to end.

Row 6

Back to color B, ss (slip stitch) ldc in the first stitch, sc, ldc, sc in next three stitches, ldc, sc, ldc, sc (10 stitches),* ldc, sc, ldc, sc next three stitches, ldc, sc, ldc, sc* across to end.

Row 7

Using Color A, ss sc in the first stitch, ldc, sc, ldc, sc in nest three stitches, ldc, sc, ldc (10 stitches), *sc, ldc, sc, ldc, sc next three, ldc, sc, ldc* across to end.

Row 8

Color B, ss ldc in the first stitch, sc, ldc, sc next 5, ldc, sc (10 stitches), *ldc, sc, ldc, sc next 5 stitches, ldc, sc* across to end.

Row 9

Color A, ss sc in the first stitch, ldc, sc in next 7 stitches, ldc, *sc, ldc, sc next 7, ldc* across to end.

Row 10

Color B, ss ldc first stitch, sc next 9 stitches (10 stitches), *ldc, sc next 9 stitches* across to end.


Pattern #3

This one is really easy and worked up takes on a stepped-up look. I am going to skip giving you the rows stitch by stitch because this post is all about showing you how to read a chart. If you do become confused, please feel free to contact me and I can send you the instructions.


Pattern #4

And here is the last pattern that I came up with. It’s squares within squares. Maybe it should be called nesting squares? Anyway, same as the pattern above, I haven’t given you and instructions other than the chart. If you have nay questions, I would be more than happy to send you the instructions. Please leave me a comment below and I can email them to you in a pdf.

 

Here is the finished product. Photos don’t do it justice. The yarn used was Yarn Bee Soft Secret from Hobby Lobby, which made it very soft. It also have a heavy sold feel to it since it’s done in single crochet.

I hope you enjoy these starter stitches, and again, if you have any questions at all or would just like to leave a comment, please feel free to do so in the form below.

Disclosure: Some of the above links are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

4s COMMENTS

4 thoughts

  • Henderson
    May 5, 2020 at 4:06 pm

    Wow, your explanation is very well done. I have to confess that I have not seen anyone explain so well how to do the mosaic crochet chart. First heard about this from my mum but she said it was one of the hardest. It doesn’t look so hard toe from your explanation here though. You seem to know so much about it here. Thanks so much for sharing.

    • Carrie Wente
      May 5, 2020 at 4:12 pm

      Thanks, I found it to be easier once you understand how to read the charts. I tried to do it the traditional way by reading the directions but was constantly losing my place and getting confused. By looking at the chart you can count how many sc are needed before you place an ldc.

      Carrie

  • Vicki
    May 9, 2020 at 4:19 am

    I learned to crochet when I was around 9 years old by looking in a mirror as I was extremely left-handed and it worked but I never really kept it up and with winter coming soon here in New Zealand I decided to do some research and arrived here to find this really great pattern and explanation on how to achieve this type of pattern.

    Now  I know for a fact mine is not going to worthy of a show cabinet but I am hoping I could maybe gift my work when its completed so wish me luck and thank you so much for sharing such wonderful helpful information.

    I am a very visual learner and this is so easy to understand- Awesome. I am going to be so clever any day now – lol

    Now get sewing those ends 🙂

    • Carrie Wente
      May 12, 2020 at 2:20 pm

      I too am left-handed. But luckily not with everything. I was able to learn how to crochet with my right hand, but I use my left to yarn over. I think this way it’s keeping my left hand busy so that it doesn’t get involved with the right hand and get in the way. LOL! It’s also a way for me to keep my tension because I have a heck of a time looping the yarn over my left fingers.

      Good luck and I hope you find crochet enjoyable again.

      Carrie

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